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General Information

Anglezarke is one of the larger quarries in the Lancashire area. It is sited on Anglezarke Moor, close to the reservoir, and just across the road lies Lester Mill Quarry. Despite being tree-filled, it is a suntrap and the routes tend to dry relatively quickly after rain. The rock is a sandy gritstone and is generally sound, though it can tend towards brittle in some parts. However, care should be taken when climbing on some parts. Some of the rock above the Left Wall Area, near Terror Cotta, should also be treated with respect.

The quarry lies on Anglezarke Moor, between the M61 and Winter Hill. To reach it from the M61 (Junction 6) follow the A6027 past the Reebok Stadium and continue to the A673 (Bolton’Horwich road) at traffic lights and then turn left. About two kilometres past Horwich, turn right at the Millstone Inn and follow a narrow road to a motorway bridge. Turn right just before this bridge and continue to the Yew Tree Inn. Take the right fork and continue between the reservoirs and past a sharp left-hand bend to a small island where the road forks. Follow the left fork for about 150 metres, past the quarry entrance on the right then drive up the hill and park in either the car park on the right, or a few metres farther on in the large layby on the left. Both quarries can also be approached from the M61 (Junction 8) for climbers approaching from the north. This is done by following signs for Blackburn, Chorley North (B6228), Heapey and Anglezarke.

All the routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT, i.e. anticlockwise, commencing from the south entrance to the quarry. PLEASE DO NOT ABSEIL ON THE GOLDEN TOWER AND TERROR COTTA AREAS, as this is causing severe erosion problems.

This is a small crag in the woods about 15 metres above the road, just south of Crag Foot. Although it is short, it is ideal for a summer evening visit and the views from the top can be particularly rewarding after the enclosure of the woods. Park in the first lay-by on the right about 300 metres north of the entrance to Scout Crag Caravan Park. From the north side of this lay-by, follow a very overgrown track for about 50 metres, then head diagonally right up the hillside to the left end of the crag. A path along the foot of the crag leads to a cave at its right end.

These are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Situated in Billinge Woods, a country park on the north-west fringe of Blackburn, this quarry provides the closest climbing ground to the centre of the town. The rock is good quality gritstone, similar to Hoghton (in texture if not in stature), but is only between eight and nine metres high and about 30 metres long. The crag is north and east-facing and therefore, it is often wet and slimy and slow to dry out.

The quarry is best approached from the Billinge End Road entrance to the woods, where there is a small car park. Walk up the main track and, 100 metres beyond the bend where the track levels out, there is an old iron gate on the left. A path immediately after this gate leads through overgrown rhododendrons to the quarry beyond a pond. Circumnavigate the pond on its left to reach the rock.

The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT, starting at an obvious rightward-slanting ramp.

Blackstone Edge is a natural grit outcrop lying along the north–south ridge of the same name, about three kilometres east of Littleborough. Known locally as `Robin Hood`s Bed`, it faces north-west and offers fine views over Littleborough, Hollingworth Lake, Chelburn Moor and the moors and hills to the west. The rock is a dark-coloured, compact gritstone, providing climbs of all grades up to E4. There are relatively few climbs, but most are well worth doing and the crag is an interesting and rewarding venue.

Park near the White House on the A58 about three kilometres north-east of Littleborough. Then walk downhill to join a footpath (Pennine Way) and follow this up left to Broadhead Drain. Follow this drainage channel across the Roman road until below the crag. Cross the drain and ascend the moor to the crag.

The climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT. A short face right of the first climb gives pleasant problems.

Brownstones is situated some seven kilometres from the centre of Bolton and lies conveniently next to Scout Road, within a stone`s-throw of ample car parking. The quarry is a fellstone grit of similar nature to (though a finer texture than) Wilton and is generally very clean. The climbs are short and this makes it an ideal spot for bouldering on a summer`s evening.

Approaching from Bolton follow the Blackburn signs, A666, about a kilometre from the town centre is a fork in the road. Take the left-hand fork (Blackburn Road carries straight on) and follow Halliwell Road to where it crosses the ring road (Ainsworth Arms pub on corner). Continue straight on up Smithills Deane Road to a crossroads (about two kilometres) and turn left. The quarry is then visible on the right after about 500 metres, set back slightly from the road.

The climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT, but no heights are given. Where numbers have previously been painted on the rock, these are listed in brackets after the grade. By tradition only technical grades are given for all the climbs. However, some of the routes on The Long Back Wall are quite serious.

Cadshaw Castle Rocks or Fairy Buttery (Battery on OS maps) is a small natural outcrop of sound rock, situated on the sunny side of a pleasant valley, opposite Cadshaw Quarry. It is an ideal place for beginners.

The rocks are reached by following a path down from the quarry to the stream. Cross this by a footbridge and ascend a short slope to arrive at the foot of the rocks.

The climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

Cadshaw lies four kilometres south of Darwen just off the A666 Darwen–Bolton road. There are several quarries on the site, with heights ranging from three metres in the Small Quarry to 23 metres in the Main Quarry. The rock is of variable quality gritstone, but on the whole it is much better than appearances might suggest and many of the routes are very rewarding.

Fifty metres north of the B6391 Turton road (Green Arms Lane) is a bus stop, and a track signposted `Egerton` leads through woods and past the Small Quarry, then round the shoulder of the hill into the main quarry at Yarnsdale Delf in less than 10 minutes. The Second Quarry lies a little past this and the other quarries are across the stream from the Second Quarry.

The climbs in all the quarries are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Cardwell is a small gritstone quarry that faces north on Jeffrey Hill, about four kilometres north-east of Longridge. It is sandy gritstone up to nine metres high and is slow to dry out, but it is in a beautiful situation for a summer`s evening. It is a complete contrast to the hard-core bouldering atmosphere at Craig y Longridge, but will appeal to lower-grade climbers seeking peace and quiet.

From the centre of Longridge follow the Jeffrey Hill signs, forking left at the White Bull then taking another left turn about one kilometre farther on, just past Beacon Fell View Caravan Park. Continue past the Golf Course to a gate on the left just about 100 metres after the brow of a hill and 200 metres short of the road junction at the top of Jeffrey Hill. Park thoughtfully near this point. The quarry lies about 100 metres down a reed-covered quarry track that leads from this gate. No dogs, please, if there are sheep in the field.

The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Castle Quarry (or Lobb Mill Delf) stands above the Rochdale canal some two kilometres east of Todmorden. It is very steep and impressive with overhangs everywhere. The routes weave their way through this steep country, rather than attacking it frontally. The rock is surprisingly sound considering the appearance and atmosphere of the crag.

The crag is approached from Haugh Lane (park near the viaduct on the main road). A path leads rightwards below the first house on the right and gains the cliff in 60 metres.

The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Most of the climbing in the quarry lies on a series of buttresses of up to 12 metres in height at the right-hand side, culminating in the much higher Main Wall. Although there is much loose rock, especially on the Main Wall, the climbing avoids these areas and most of the routes are both sound and enjoyable.

Leave the M65 at the Blackburn West exit, Junction 3 (as for Stanworth) and follow the A675 southwards for about two kilometres to Abbey Village. At the south end of the village, opposite the Hare and Hounds pub, turn right along Dole Lane towards Withnell then park about 300 metres farther on at a sharp right-hand bend, directly in front of the quarry entrance.

The routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT and they all lie on the rock at the right-hand side of the quarry.

Chapel Head lies on the Witherslack Escarpment, facing south-west above Witherslack Hall School, about 10 kilometres south-west of Kendal. It is often in condition when the Lakeland crags are under a watery deluge.

From the A590 (Levens–Barrow road) turn off at the Witherslack signs and follow signs to the village. Continue past the village for about two kilometres to reach Witherslack Hall. Park with consideration for the locals and follow the short dirt track on the right, down to fields. A public footpath bears left across the field and into woodland. From the stile and gate, follow the track rightwards for 200 metres to a clearing where the crag can be seen. A permitted path then climbs up leftwards, passing a notice-board at the base of a scree slope. A posted path then runs diagonally rightwards up the scree then swings back left to arrive steeply at the base of Moonchild Buttress.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT, starting from the dirty gully 80 metres to the left from the point where the path meets the crag. This is the left-hand limit of current climbing.

Although the crag is relatively small, it gives quite a good variety of climbing from steep wall and roof climbs to the more laid back style of slab climbing. This variety makes up for its small size and makes it a pleasant place to visit. Due to its exposed southerly aspect it dries very quickly.

The crag is just over one kilometre to the west of this point and its top is just south of the boundary wall. It can be reached in about twenty minutes by using the wall as a guide and keeping to the north of it, then cross the wall with care at the crag. However, take care to avoid the boggy sections after wet weather.

Cow`s Mouth Quarry is set beside a gravelled section of the Pennine Way, overlooking the valley about four kilometres north-east of Littleborough. The crag is sheltered and faces west, so it catches the sun. It is mainly composed of solid gritstone. Its slabs, walls, cracks and overhangs give the cliff a fine variety of climbs.

There are no access restrictions in force here and the quarry can easily be reached from the A58 (Littleborough–Ripponden section). Cars can be parked just below the White House pub. Walk up the hill past the pub to iron gates on the left. Follow the Pennine Way, passing the reservoir, to reach the quarry in around 20 minutes. A good bus service (Halifax–Ripponden–Rochdale) passes the pub.

The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT commencing with an obvious and excellent slab. The smaller upper quarried area (Bivouac Wall) has a 4c/5a traverse and some problems, as has the short wall at right-angles to the base of the slab. Most of the slab routes are character-building, with a bold feel to them. All are worth doing.

Just over one kilometre west of Warton village there are three small crags hidden in the trees immediately above the lower road to Silverdale. The largest of these is Crag Foot, which, despite initial appearances is relatively tall. It is also extremely sheltered from most winds and often stays dry even when it is raining. The other two crags in this area, Barrow Scout Cove and Scout Crag Quarry, are smaller, but they are nevertheless worth a short visit.

Crag Foot lies above the lower road from Warton to Silverdale, about one kilometre before the level-crossing. Cars can be parked immediately below the crag in the second lay-by on the right after the Scout Crag Caravan Park.

The climbs are described from left to right and DESCENTS are possible at either end of the crag by slightly awkward scrambling, or by abseil. The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

At the far end of the quarry the height increases and there are some interesting longer climbs. Unfortunately, these often suffer from seepage but, given the right conditions, they can be most worthwhile and it is a pity that so few climbers are willing to explore them.

This quarry, which is known locally as Beanpole Delf, overlooks the Todmorden–Hebden Bridge road (A6033), about two kilometres from the centre of Todmorden and almost directly below an obvious church tower on the skyline. The climbing is limited, but nevertheless, some of the climbs are very worthwhile and it is a good place for a quiet evening.

To reach the quarry from Todmorden, go towards Hebden Bridge for about one kilometre to the Shannon and Chesapeake pub, then turn left up Phoenix Street and after a further 150 metres turn right into Shakespeare Avenue. Where the road turns left, go right then left on to a dirt track. Pass some houses and follow the track rightwards below the quarry, where cars can be parked just off the track.

The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Deeply Vale is a very solid gritstone quarry above a small reservoir on the moors about four kilometres north-east of Bury, midway between the M66 and the A680 (Owd Betts road)% The crag comprises a series of arêtes and corners, between which lie steep, slabby walls, punctuated at times by good cracklines, with the huge roof of Mein Kampf in the centre.

Deeply Vale is an enjoyable little crag of good quality quarried gritstone. Its easy access makes it ideal for an evening visit. From the centre of Bury, follow the A56 (Walmersley Road)%north for about three kilometres to a dip in the road, followed by a short rise to a set of traffic lights. Turn right on to Walmersley Old Road. Continue to the Mason`s Arms public house and turn right on to Bentley Road, going under the motorway bridge. Follow the main track to the left, up the hill to a small crossroad. Turn right along a metalled road to a T-junction and turn left. 200 metres farther down on the right there is a gate. Park carefully without blocking the gate or road. Go through this gate and follow the track for about 500 metres, then the crag will be seen set back a little on the right.

The climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT starting at an arête just right of a large wall set with an iron hook at six metres.

The quarry lies eight kilometres south-east of Preston, near the village of Brindle. Climbing here is on variable quality gritstone and being west-facing, it is ideal for an evening visit. The quarry offers a wide variety of climbing, with something to suit most climbers and some classic gritstone quarry climbs.

From the M6 (Junction 29) follow the A6 south for nearly two kilometres to a small roundabout at Clayton Green. Turn left here on to the B5256 and continue for about a kilometre to another roundabout. Follow the left turning from this roundabout and cross the M61 almost immediately, then after a further 50 metres turn right into Holt Lane and follow the road round until it is possible to drive into the quarry on the left a few hundred metres farther on.

The quarry is conveniently divided up into three areas; the Pool Area on the right, which provides the best climbing; the Overhang Area marked by the great overhangs on the left side of the crag; and the Intermediate Area which lies between the other two.

This quarry which is affectionately known as `Docky Dam` lies in woods above an old mill lodge, just north of the A680 at Norden, about five kilometres north west of Rochdale. Because the crag is in trees, it is fairly green, but this does not interfere with the climbing and it is often in condition when other crags are not. However, it is mainly of local interest and value.

From the Bridge Inn on the A680 in Norden, follow Greenbooth Road directly opposite the pub. This is a cobbled road that winds left, then back right and up to an old mill lodge. Park considerately near the lodge. A footpath on the left leads across from the end of the mill lodge to a footbridge. Cross this and the quarry lies ahead in the trees. About two minutes` walk.

The climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

This is a steep quarry, about 700 metres south of Broughton beside the Foxfield road. The rock is a geological curiosity, with very smooth slate which has a most unusual blistered structure and is stained with hematite. There are only three `asinine` routes at present.

A curious limestone plug in the Duddon Estuary, which is visible from the A595. Approach is via Grange Marsh Farm, and care is needed with parking to prevent blocking access. On the left is a set of short friction slabs with several eliminate problems marked in blue paint, as well as a delicate girdle. Around the back is a continuously overhanging low wall with a desperate monster girdle.

The routes that are described are located in a cove on the edge of the estuary, which faces Millom and Black Combe. These are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

Egerton is an extensive gritstone quarry clearly visible across the valley from Wilton. Climbing in the quarry is not concentrated in one area, but is fragmented on a number of sheltered buttresses, which despite initial appearances hide some of the finest routes in the area in terms of quality. As a result of the quarry`s layout, there are always some climbs to be found in the sunshine, though the best area, Wood Buttress, has a shady aspect. To aid location of the routes, some have their initials painted at their base.

Egerton Quarry is situated approximately seven kilometres north of Bolton just off the A666 Bolton – Blackburn road. To reach the quarry, follow the A666 to Cox Green Road, which is the last road on the right when travelling from Bolton. This is directly opposite a pub/restaurant that has recently been renamed Barocco’s. Go to the end of Cox Green Road and park. Follow the path that was the old road, for a little over 200 metres then, just before crossing the bridge, turn left into a track blocked by boulders. After about 40 metres turn right at some more boulders on another path, that leads down into the quarry. This path leads to a junction with several other tracks and paths at a point known as Six Ways. From this point the first path leads towards Grooved Wall and Red Wall, the third path lead down to the stepping stones and the final path leads back towards the Bridge Area.

The quarry is surprisingly complex and is effectively split into two parts by Cox Green Road, with the main part on the east side of the road (i.e. farthest from the war memorial). A track beneath the road at the Bridge Area links the two parts. The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT starrting at the Bridge Area on its northern side and then working round the rest of the quarry in a clockwise direction, finishing at the opposite side of the Bridge Area.

The climbing at Fairy Steps is situated on two parallel escarpments, the Upper and Lower Crags. These are both several hundred metres long and they consist of climbable rock of up to a maximum of 10 metres high, interspersed with many broken sections. It is a pity that this area has been ignored and written off by climbers in the past, because this has only resulted in paths becoming lost, an increase of lichen growth and an overuse of the other documented crags in the area. The crags face west and as a result of recent tree thinning many of the buttresses now enjoy afternoon sunshine, which has greatly improved the climbing. This makes Fairy Steps a pleasant little crag that is well worth an evening visit.

This section of Lower Crag extends leftwards from the Narrow Cleft and so the climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

The climbing at Fairy Steps is situated on two parallel escarpments, the Upper and Lower Crags. These are both several hundred metres long and they consist of climbable rock of up to a maximum of 10 metres high, interspersed with many broken sections. It is a pity that this area has been ignored and written off by climbers in the past, because this has only resulted in paths becoming lost, an increase of lichen growth and an overuse of the other documented crags in the area. The crags face west and as a result of recent tree thinning many of the buttresses now enjoy afternoon sunshine, which has greatly improved the climbing. This makes Fairy Steps a pleasant little crag that is well worth an evening visit.

These climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT, starting right of the steps in the Narrow Cleft (as one faces the crag).

The climbing at Fairy Steps is situated on two parallel escarpments, the Upper and Lower Crags. These are both several hundred metres long and they consist of climbable rock of up to a maximum of 10 metres high, interspersed with many broken sections. It is a pity that this area has been ignored and written off by climbers in the past, because this has only resulted in paths becoming lost, an increase of lichen growth and an overuse of the other documented crags in the area. The crags face west and as a result of recent tree thinning many of the buttresses now enjoy afternoon sunshine, which has greatly improved the climbing. This makes Fairy Steps a pleasant little crag that is well worth an evening visit.

From the fine easy arête above, that bounds the Steps on their left, this section of the Upper Crag extends to an overhanging buttress some metres farther left. The rock then becomes much more broken. The climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

The climbing at Fairy Steps is situated on two parallel escarpments, the Upper and Lower Crags. These are both several hundred metres long and they consist of climbable rock of up to a maximum of 10 metres high, interspersed with many broken sections. It is a pity that this area has been ignored and written off by climbers in the past, because this has only resulted in paths becoming lost, an increase of lichen growth and an overuse of the other documented crags in the area. The crags face west and as a result of recent tree thinning many of the buttresses now enjoy afternoon sunshine, which has greatly improved the climbing. This makes Fairy Steps a pleasant little crag that is well worth an evening visit.

These climbs are described as one faces the crag, working RIGHTWARDS from the Steps.

Climb the obvious wide crackline in the front face of the detached block. Step right at the top.

The earliest climbers to visit Farleton were probably Ian Dobson and Roger Gott, who discovered the main crag in 1966. During their early visits they climbed most of the easier lines, including Farleton Crack, Appleton Crack, Earwig Two, Idleness and Doodlebug. Dobson introduced Stew Wilson to the crag in early 1967 and this group added a further batch of climbs, including Deb`s Crack. However, the most notable route was The Shriek of Baghdad by Wilson, which still stands as the classic of the crag (as its polished state testifies!). Later that year Wilson introduced Bill Lounds and Chris Eilbeck to the crag, and Lounds immediately went for the impressive wall immediately to the right of The Shriek, where he produced Agrippa and Herod, two powerful climbs that were ripe for Lounds` powerful approach. Lounds also started to explore the far right end of the main crag, which he opened up with Enyoka, a short, but nevertheless demanding route.

The quarry lies on the fellside directly behind the village of Farleton, just above an old lime kiln. However, it should not be approached direct. The quarry is small and an abundance of trees nearby means that it is often slow to dry.

To reach the quarry, park thoughtfully in Farleton village and walk to the sharp bend on the road that enters the village from the A6070. From here a footpath that is signed to Farleton Fell leads along the left side of a field to a small gate. Go through this gate and turn left to a left fork after about 80 metres. Take this, then bear back round below the top of an old quarry and go through a curious wicket between two trees. Then strike slightly right and downwards to the foot of the quarry.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

The crag is longer than the rest of the rock at Farleton, but is rather broken and much of it is split by several small grassy ledges. The crag is very deceptive, because it is dominated by a fairly nondescript lower section, that guards some excellent rock at the top. However, it is well worth climbing the often lineless and ledgy bottom sections to be rewarded with some classic finishes, mostly at around Severe to VS. Many of the routes are very recent and they should generally improve with traffic.

Alternatively, from the end of the main crag continue north (leftwards) until it is possible to descend through the broken lower tier, then continue northwards up a path.

The crag overlooks the Bacup–Todmorden road (A681) about 200 metres from its junction with the A6033 Todmorden–Littleborough road. Its position is a climber`s dream – in the `garden` of the cottage to its left. The crag is about 25 metres high, of dark gritstone with an obvious roof near its top.

The climbs take the centre of the main face. A bracket is bolted to the wall and a ramp drops down leftwards to the ground.

Goldmire is an extensive limestone quarry which lies about one kilometre west of Dalton-in-Furness and five kilometres from Barrow-in-Furness, which can be seen from the Dalton bypass.

To reach Goldmire, follow the A590 towards Barrow-in-Furness, to the roundabout at the end of the Dalton by-pass. This is at the foot of a long downhill section that curves through a cutting and is about five kilometres before Barrow. Turn left at this roundabout, then turn left towards Thwaite Flat after nearly a kilometre, take the next road on the right and park carefully at a gate by the railway. Walk along to the lower tier of the quarry, then follow the obvious path that rises up on the right to reach the foot of the upper tier.

All the climbs that are described lie on a prominent black wall on the upper tier and are described from RIGHT to LEFT. The first route starts about 50 metres left of the main shattered corner of the upper tier, where the wall is characterized by a prominent curving overlap and roof halfway up the crag.

Hall Stones (previously incorrectly known as Lower Winsley) is a small delf situated on the edge of the moors about two kilometres north of Todmorden. The climbs are short and the crag is not very extensive, but the rock is excellent and although it is certainly not the place for the hard man, it is a very pleasant setting for a summer evening visit for climbers in the lower grades.

Most of the climbs were first recorded by Les Ainsworth, Dave Cronshaw, and John Ryden on three snatched visits during the summer of 1982, but true first ascent details are not known.

This quarry is situated eight kilometres north of Bury, just above Ramsbottom, and one kilometre from the prominent local landmark of Peel Tower. There are in fact two quarries on this site; the first (smaller)%one has some boulder problems, whilst all the routes described lie in the second (larger)%quarry. Climbing here, on the whole, can only be described as mediocre, and mostly for the connoisseur of loose finishes on vegetated rock, but nevertheless, one or two of the routes are worth seeking out.

To reach the quarry from Bury, take the B6214 north for seven kilometres to a junction at Holcombe Brook (Hare and Hounds pub opposite)% Continue up the steep continuation of the B6214 (Lumb Carr Road)%for just over one kilometre to the Shoulder of Mutton pub on the right. Opposite the pub is a bridleway marked Moor Road. Park thoughtfully, then walk up the bridleway, past a cattlegrid, to a fork in the track. Go left and follow the track up and round into the quarry.

The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT with the first route being on the small buttress on the left-hand side.

This is a small quarry situated adjacent to the A590 just south of High Newton. It has two climbs which are well worth 20 minutes effort on the way to, or out of, The Lake District. Climbers are asked not to park on the grass verge below the crag.

The climbs lie on a steep slab at the north end of the quarry. Some doubtful holds exist due to the nature of the rock. Now overgrown.

Incidentally, carnivorous climbers may be interested to learn that sirloin of beef originates from Hoghton Tower after a previous visitor, King James I, was so taken by the food that was laid on, that he knighted a loin of beef. Tower Woods were also the setting for much of Harrison Ainsworth`s `Lancashire Witches`.

This quarry is situated only four kilometres north of Rochdale, above Spring Mill Reservoir in Whitworth. The crag is literally a box-shaped hole in the ground, with a shorter wall above and to one side of the main quarry. The climbs are on sound rock, although the usual care applicable to quarried rock should be observed. The crag is very sheltered, and is at its best during the warmer periods. Some tipping has taken place in the past though this in no way affects the climbing, but the crag has been used little over the past couple of years, and some vegetation is starting to return. Although it now awaits a new generation of cleaners, nevertheless, some of the climbs are still worth doing.

Two approaches are possible from the junction in Hall Street which is just off the A671 in Whitworth (almost opposite the Dog and Partridge)% The junction is just past Whitworth Comprehensive School. The first possibility is to turn left and go through Wall Bank Estate to a parking place near a mill. Walk up by the wall above the mill for 50 metres, cross it, then a track leads across flat open ground to a rise which leads to the quarry. Alternatively, turn right and go up until a tight left-hand hairpin leads to a narrow lane. The lane ends at an open space near a farm and two houses; Park there. The quarry lies over the wall right of the houses. This approach is quickest if on foot – 10 minutes.

The routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT starting at a corner, just right of a green wall, capped by an overhang.

Although Humphrey Head came to prominence as a sport climbing venue, many of the more traditional climbs are also very worthwhile.

The best climbing is at The Rakes, which gives climbs of up to nine metres on excellent limestone, generally ranging from VD to VS. However, the bottom couple of moves on some climbs can be particularly hard for their grade.

The eastern approach, from the village of Hutton Roof, is the shortest way to The Rakes (5 to 10 minutes). Park at the south end of the village in a lay-by near a phone box, then walk back up the hill to a track on the left, immediately before the turn to Kirkby Lonsdale. Follow this for 100 metres, then go through a gate and follow a path by the wall round to the left. After about 20 metres fork right, then left and head for an obvious large perched block on the skyline. Pass just to the right of this block then continue straight up the hill. At the top of the steep section the angle eases and a path bears left to South America Wall.

The crag forms part of a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI); owned by the National Trust. A number of nationally-rare tree species grow on the crag and in order to avoid damage to them and the other vegetation it is often necessary to use bolt runners and to make abseil descents (see Access section for more information).

Jackdaw Quarry is a flooded quarry at Capernwray, about two kilometres north-east of the Over Kellet junction (J35) on the M6. It is used for scuba diving and the owners are not currently prepared to permit climbing. If climbing is permitted in future, it will be necessary to ask at the Dive Shop on site before climbing.

To reach the quarry from the motorway, turn towards Over Kellet, then turn left at the centre of the village and keep right at a nearby fork. The quarry is on the right, immediately before a sharp bend into Capernwray.

All the climbing is on a small buttress, which can be seen at the far right end of the quarry, from the entrance taken by the divers. The routes are reached by descending a small gully on the right (facing the pool) then following a right-descending ramp to a platform about three metres above the water. A narrow, white, impending wall, unclimbed to date, is the major feature and to the right of this is a bolt belay.

The quarry lies on the opposite side of the Rivington’White Coppice road to Anglezarke Quarry and is of similar rock. However, it was worked up until the 1930s and does not see a lot of activity, so some suspect rock is still present. This is localised and should improve with traffic. Special care should be taken with Cheese Buttress, The Set Back and the Upper Right Tier. However, recent cleaning has improved these areas considerably and many of the climbs deserve to become more popular, particularly on the higher section at Evil Wall. It is a pity that many climbers who visit Anglezarke across the road do not also spend a short time here.

Park as for Anglezarke and from the opposite side of the road to Anglezarke walk down for about 50 metres to a fence just above the top of the quarry. The foot of the quarry can then be reached by a scramble down about 50 metres farther on, which leads to the right-hand side of Introductory Bay.

All the routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT, i.e. anticlockwise, commencing from the south entrance to the quarry. PLEASE DO NOT ABSEIL ON THE GOLDEN TOWER AND TERROR COTTA AREAS, as this is causing severe erosion problems.

There are further routes to be done in the quarry, but these will require some cleaning.

George`s Lanes can also be reached from junction 6 of the M61, by turning towards the Reebok Stadium, then at the A673 (Bolton–Horwich) roundabout, turn left. After 400 metres turn right immediately before the second set of pedestrian lights into Ainsworth Avenue, which eventually becomes New Chapel Lane. Continue up this road, keeping left at a fork after 400 metres, then after a sharp right bend, the road turns into a narrow twisting lane. This meets the main road at Ye Jolly Crofters. Turn right, then immediately left along George`s Lane.

The various quarry faces that collectively constitute Lumbutts Quarry lie along Langfield Edge, which faces north-east, overlooking the village of Lumbutts, about three kilometres south-east of Todmorden.

The Shepherd`s Rest can be reached from the A6033 Todmorden–Littleborough road from Walsden. Follow the Lumbutts and Mankinholes signs, always bearing right until the pub is reached after three kilometres; park opposite. A gate gives access to a footpath leading up the hill and along the base of the rocks. The pub can also be approached from Spring Side, about two kilometres on the Hebden Bridge side of Todmorden; a lane opposite the Rose and Crown pub crosses the canal and leads up to Lumbutts village, and the Shepherd`s Rest lies a little over a kilometre farther on. The crag is reached after a pleasantly brisk 20-minute walk.

All the climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT. The unfortunately named Main Quarry is the large expanse of rock first seen from the approach path. The best climbing is found well to the left of this region. The Pillar is a good reference point and Hidden Wall is up the grass slope to its right. There are some climbs in the Main Quarry, starting at the Solar Slabs Area.

This is a small and rather lineless limestone quarry directly above a football ground in Millhead, about one kilometre south of Warton village.

To reach the quarry from Warton, follow the road towards Carnforth and about 50 metres past a humpback bridge over the River Kear, turn right at a footpath. This leads past some cottages to the football ground. The climbing lies at the extreme right of this.

The routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

The crag lies at the western corner of the southern end of the Whitbarrow escarpment, directly above the hamlet of Mill Side. The routes are steep and of high quality and are generally adequately protected, mainly with bolts. Most of the loose skin of rock has now been removed from the existing routes, but there may still be a few places where care is necessary.

From the A590 drive into the hamlet of Mill Side and park about 200 metres into the village just before a steep `No through road` on the right. Please park carefully and in particular avoid parking at the bottom of the hill, because this can cause problems for the milk tankers. Walk up the road on the right for about 500 metres past the Beck Head path to a permissive footpath on the left. Follow this path for a little over 200 metres to a marker post where the main path turns right. Turn left at this point and continue past a scree to the foot of the crag. About fifteen minutes from the bottom of the hill.

These are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

The crag is short, but steep and most of the climbs are strenuous. In the past, vegetation and a pool at the foot have dissuaded many from climbing at Ousel`s Nest. However, the crag has now been cleaned and there is better access to the rock, which has considerably improved the crag. The reward for visitors will be many good, hard routes, including a few excellent lines, that have not yet been climbed.

When walking across lush green fields to the rock face, a wall will be seen on the extreme right of some trees. The first route starts on an overgrown slab just to the right. The routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

This quarry overlooks the A62 (Oldham–Huddersfield road) a kilometre north-east of the centre of Delph. It is a short gritstone quarry, which is a pleasant venue for an evening visit by middle-grade climbers.

From Denshaw and the M62 (junction 21) follow the A6052 into Delph and at a sharp right-hand bend just before crossing the river, turn left. Follow this road to the A62, where the top of the quarry can be seen on the moorside, slightly to the right. Turn left and park immediately on the right, below a stone waterworks building. If travelling on the A62 from Oldham, the waterworks building is on the right, just past Delph, shortly after the top of the quarry can be seen. The quarry can be reached by a short walk diagonally rightwards across the moor.

All but one of the climbs are on the back wall and they are described from LEFT to RIGHT, starting at the left side of a grassy terrace.

The quarry is situated across the valley from Harcles Hill, five kilometres north of Bury and about two kilometres south-east of the centre of Ramsbottom. It is less than two kilometres from Deeply Vale and the rock is very similar. However, whilst it is higher and more extensive than Deeply Vale, some sections are a little more broken. Much of the quarry is dominated by large square-cut roofs, which are penetrated by some interesting climbing. The quarry is a suntrap and like Deeply Vale it is an ideal crag for an evening visit.

The initial part of the approach to the quarry is the same as for Deeply Vale. From the centre of Bury, follow the A556 (Walmersley Road)%north out of the centre for about three kilometres until, after a short rise, a church tower appears on the left. Turn right at the traffic lights at the crest of the rise (Walmersley Old Road)%and follow this for about 800 metres to the Mason`s Arms pub. At this point, instead of turning right (towards Deeply Vale)% bear left and continue on cobbles and across the motorway for a further 800 metres to the Lord Raglan. Just less than one kilometre past this is a radio mast on the left and the quarry can be seen through a gate on the right. Continue past a turning to Hillside Kennels and park about 50 metres past a solitary house on the right where the lane widens.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT, starting at the extreme left end of the quarry.

The crag, visible from the road, stretches for approximately 900 metres along the top of Pule Hill; roughly 500 metres east of the Oldham–Huddersfield road (A62), where it runs down from Standedge Cutting into Marsden.

From Oldham follow the A62 Huddersfield road – to the top of Standedge Cutting at the crest of the Pennines. After a further 500 metres, the Great Western Hotel will be seen on the left and just past this is The Carriage House Hotel on the right. Park at a lay-by on the right-hand side of the road, about 400 metres past The Carriage House, two kilometres before Marsden. A short path from this point leads first right, then back left to the first climbs and The Sentinel. The quarry lies more or less directly behind the tunnel ventilation shafts and the main part of the outcrop stretches rightwards from this.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT, beginning at some broken rocks 30 metres to the left of The Sentinel. On the right-hand side of these rocks, a wrinkled face has a short dog-legged crack at mid-height.

This is the small limestone crag (shrouded in trees) that lies 300 metres right of White Scar, on private land, and is somewhat dwarfed by its big brother.

Leave the A590 as if approaching White Scar, but turn right just after the farm (before entering the quarry proper). Follow the track for about 50 metres to a lay-by on the left. The crag lies ahead on the left.

The routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

Reddyshore Scout is the series of buttresses that lie on the eastern rim of the moorland plateau overlooking the river Roch and the Rochdale canal, some four kilometres north of Littleborough. This collection of steep buttresses is in an imposing and exposed position, further enhanced by the angle of the slope beneath. The sense of exposure that this situation engenders gives it that big crag feel and ensures that seconds must belay to the rock. The excellent routes are usually on sound rock, and where there is loose rock it is noted in the text, and does not interfere, usually, with the quality of the climbing. However, all visitors must be aware that rockfalls do occur.

The crags are reached from Calderbrook Road, which leads off the A6033 Littleborough–Todmorden road at the toll house (an obvious and interesting octagonal building clearly placed on the Littleborough side of the junction). From this road, two tracks lead to the crags; one along the top of the cliff, the other below the grass slope. The upper track is gated, the lower track begins near a ventilation shaft for the Summit railway tunnel. Park off the road and walk to the crag in five to ten minutes. Access is unrestricted.

The usual point of arrival at the crag is Fence Buttress. Pit Buttress lies 100 metres to the left. The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

These quarries are situated between Delph and Scouthead near the A62, above a minor road which runs parallel to the A62, and about one kilometre west of the centre of Delph. The views into the Chew Valley are incomparable, so it is well worth a visit.

From Denshaw and the M62 (junction 21) follow the A6052 into Delph, then a couple of hundred metres after crossing the river, look out for the Bull`s Head pub on the left and a wedge-shaped building (Delph Library) in front of you. Fork right on to Stoneswood Road immediately right of the library and follow this for a little over one kilometre to arrive at a bend with a Road Narrows sign and a metal gate on the right. There is limited parking by the gate. Through the gate the First Bay is immediately on the left and the path ahead leads past the Second and Third Bays.

The quarry is split into three obvious bays and the climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

For the most part the quarry is composed of two tiers and all the climbing (as yet) is on the more stable upper tier. The rock on this tier is generally solid, though it would be advisable to clean any intended new route before leading. The shaly lower tier does deter some climbers from climbing at Round Barn, but as there are no climbs on it, this impression is unfounded and some of the climbs here are very worthwhile. There is an abundance of belay stakes available for most climbs, but some are rather feeble.

This small quarry lies between Barrow Scout Cove and Scout Crag Caravan Site. To reach it, park in the lay-by as for Barrow Scout Cove, then walk back along the road for about 150 metres to a footpath on the left, immediately after a limekiln. Walk up this footpath for about 20 metres, then scramble up left to the old quarry track and follow this into the quarry itself.

These are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

Scout Scar is the limestone escarpment five kilometres west of Kendal, which has been known improperly as Underbarrow Scar in previous editions of the guidebook. The rock is fairly sound with little seepage. It is quite sheltered and provides excellent training for `the pump`. The crag provides a mixture of traditional and sport climbs.

To reach Scout Scar from Kendal, turn left from the main one-way system (A6) immediately before the Town Hall and follow the Underbarrow road to a car park just past the police radio mast on top of the hill. Cross the road to a gate and follow the path along the top of the hill. About 300 metres past the mushroom-topped shelter, immediately before the start of the first field directly below the scar, a rough path leads down to the foot of the crag.

The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Known locally as Buckstones or Pingot Quarry, Shaw Quarry lies on the western slope of Crow Knoll, in the Crompton Fold area of Shaw. The quarry is of an open aspect and, being box-shaped, the sun touches all parts of the quarry at some time during the day.

The quarry can be reached from the A663 (Shaw–Newhey road) by turning into Buckstones Road (B6197) about one kilometre north of Shaw. If approaching from the M62, turn off at junction 21 where the A640 leads into Newhey and the A663 leads out past The Jubilee public house. Buckstones Road lies one kilometre ahead on the left. Follow this road until 200 metres past the Park Hotel, a cobbled track, before a church, leads left past Pingot Cottages. The lane ascends to a sharp left turn and the way into the quarry lies straight ahead. There is no access problem.

All the climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT. The first two routes are hard for their grade.

It comprises a group of quarried gritstone buttresses and a small outcrop in a pleasant setting on the hillside with excellent views all round. On the left-hand side of the crag the rock is of variable quality and so the climbing is limited to the better sections of rock, but nevertheless the climbs are worthwhile and there are also possibilities for further routes. At the other end of the crag, the main quarry rises to about 20 metres and gives some very impressive climbs that are well worth the effort which is needed to get to this somewhat isolated crag.

If approaching on the B6107 from Meltham, Deer Hill Park Road is on the left, about 500 metres past the Traveller`s Rest public house.

A visit to the crag can easily be combined with a pleasant walk to Lord`s Seat or elsewhere on Whitbarrow.

From the car park continue along the track for about 400 metres to a barn just past Raven Close Scar. About 100 metres farther on, cross a ladder stile on the left and follow the track that rises first left then back right. After some way this merges with a slightly larger track (note this point, because it can be harder to find on returning) which continues upwards to a small clearing with small limestone scars on the right. Take the more distinct right fork at the start of this clearing and then about 100 metres further on, take the left fork, then fork right about 80 metres farther on. Follow the track through a gateway and about 500 metres past this there is a right-hand bend and the track starts to descend to a cairn on the right side of the track about 100 metres from the bend. Follow the path that leads right over a slight rise to meet another grassy track. Turn left along this for about 150 metres to a small `gargoyle` boulder on the left side of the track. At this point turn right and head directly through the trees for a few metres to reach the scar at the obvious Fallen Block.

The quarry consists of two bands of gritstone. The upper band being harder and much less friable than the lower one. The result is an obvious overhang which runs the length of the quarry. The lower band is loose, giving all the routes a serious air. The traverse below the overhang (Pennine Way) is not technically difficult for those who like stomach-traverses on sandy ledges over earthy blocks.

A quicker approach is to look out for a hotel on the right of the A62, beyond this the A670 drops off right to Uppermill and soon Globe Farm will be seen on the left. Beyond this turn left into Manor Lane. Where the road widens and joins Standedge Foot Road there is parking space. Follow the public footpath signs towards Rock Farm, go over the stile on the right and directly up into the quarry (four minutes walk from car).

Stanworth quarry lies about one kilometre north of Abbey Village, and to the east of the A675 Bolton – Preston road. Several years ago the original quarry was filled in, but although some routes were lost, the majority of the good climbing was left. The remaining rock provides varied climbing on generally good gritstone in small sheltered bays faced by steep grassy slopes.

From the Junction 3 on the M65, the quarry can be reached by travelling towards Bolton on the A675 and taking the first track on the left (signposted to Stanworth Farm) after the restaurant. After a couple of hundred bumpy metres there is a stile on the right behind some trees and cars can be parked just beyond this, about 50 metres from a transformer on a pole at the washing plant (N.B. It is not safe to park beneath this transformer). Cross the stile and a metalled road to a second stile. Undercut Buttress rises straight ahead in about 60 metres.

The first routes to be described lie on Undercut Buttress, which lies about 100 metres south of the washing plant entrance. From this point the routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT.

Since the previous guidebook, extensive cleaning has greatly improved most of the existing climbs and has also revealed several good new climbs. As a result of this, the Stronstrey Bank area should be much more pleasant for climbers, especially for summer evening visits. Nevertheless care must still be taken, as some of the tops still contain loose rock. Some of the climbs can become very green after wet weather, but others dry quickly, especially those on Black Brook Buttress.

To reach the quarry, cross the bridge directly above the cricket ground, then turn immediately right over two more bridges. About 50 metres past the third bridge an obvious track leads diagonally right up the moorside. After about 150 metres a grassy bowl is reached. The isolated buttress at the top of this is the Bank itself, but to reach the main climbing, continue past the grassy bowl, then follow an obvious path into the quarry. The easiest way to reach the Bank is by contouring back left from the quarry.

The quarry is set on the moor above and east of the A6033 Littleborough–Todmorden road at the village of Summit. The quarry is generally sound, but there is some loose rock. The text mentions this where necessary. There are cracks, slabs and walls here and there is a fine variety of climbs to be enjoyed. The crag does dry slowly, so a day or so of dryish weather is needed to ensure that most of the climbs are dry.

The best approach is from the Summit Inn, about three kilometres north of Littleborough, where there is a bus stop on the Rochdale–Burnley and Rochdale–Todmorden–Halifax routes. If coming by car, turn down the cobbled lane beside the pub, cross the canal, turn left and park on the left about 50 metres farther on.Then walk along the track to a hairpin bend which leads rightwards. At this point cross the stile on the left and follow the track parallel to the canal, upwards to Canal Buttress. Continue along and round to the right to a fence and another stile. The narrow defile that leads into the quarry lies ahead. This pleasant approach takes about 20 minutes.

All the climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Clearly seen from the A590 just north of Ulverston, these clean slate slabs are a popular practice ground. Park in the steep lane below the hill. The slabs themselves lie halfway up the hill about 150 metres from the gate at the end of the lane. From the gate, keep parallel to the A590 for about 50 metres, then strike directly up the hillside to the prominent, steep slabs, directly above a bench on a tarmac path.

The routes start behind a short protecting flake and are described from RIGHT to LEFT. The rock on top of the slabs has been vandalised by the needless insertion of an over-abundance of belay bolts.

This pleasant little esoteric crag is situated in some of Lancashire`s most inspiring yet bleak landscape, above the village of Tarnbrook, to the east of the Trough of Bowland road. It lies about five kilometres north-west of the summit of the Trough road and 12 kilometres west-south-west of Lancaster. The crag offers some first-class bouldering and some longer climbs of all grades – all on excellent rock.

Thorn Crag lies at the crest of the fell which can be seen east of the Trough to the right of the Trough of Bowland road. To reach it by car when travelling from Dunsop Bridge, follow the road towards Lancaster which passes the Trough of Bowland Quarry and continue along it for a further five or six kilometres until, on a sharp left-hand bend it is possible to turn right into a cul-de-sac leading to the sleepy hamlet of Tarnbrook. Follow this road to the hamlet, and park on its fringes with consideration for the small community.

The routes are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Tonacliffe Quarry is situated on the western edge of Roshy Hill, overlooking the Whitworth Valley just north of Healey. It reaches nine metres in places and is a quarried gritstone. The rock is reasonable, although the ravages of the past few winters have caused some rock fall. There is some dubious rock, but this is obvious and does not usually interfere with the climbs, or the enjoyment thereof. It is a well-used crag, being popular for evening or `short day` visits.

The quarry is reached from Rochdale by following the A671 until 800 metres north of Healey Corner. Tonacliffe Road leads off right and in turn Highpeak Lane turns off right 800 metres farther on. The steep hill is followed to where it eases off into a level green track which leads back left. Considerate parking is available a little farther on, near the `public footpath` sign. The green track leads to the quarry in about 200 metres.

The quarry is best considered in two sections; when entering the quarry the Main Bay is seen first, with the left-hand section making up another bay. With startling originality these have been named from left to right as Bay One and Bay Two. The first climbs start at the extreme left end of Bay One. The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

The quarry faces roughly south-west and gets plenty of sun, so most of the rock dries quickly apart from one or two seepage lines and after prolonged rain there is some drainage from the hillside above. The right side of the crag has a large number of trees and the routes are generally dirtier and slower to dry. The crag is limestone of quite a compact nature, but with a number of detached blocks. Good protection is often hard to find. The climbing is generally of a balancy nature, with a predominance of sloping holds; the routes are often steeper than they appear from below, which can be quite disconcerting at first.

The quarry lies above the road through the Trough of Bowland from Dunsop Bridge, one kilometre north of Sykes Farm. There is good parking by the small waterworks directly below the crag, though the crag is actually hidden from view here. The simplest approach is to walk a short way up the road to where it crosses the stream. A gate gives access to an obvious track which leads directly to the crag in only a few minutes.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Main Wall is so eye-catching that on a first visit the other attractions can easily be overlooked, but Assagai Wall is a very rewarding piece of rock, while Asylum Wall and Red Wall offer contrasting styles of desperation. The areas of rock in between, whilst being less obviously attractive, also have some very worthwhile routes.

Troy Quarry overlooks Haslingden Grane about three kilometres north-west of Haslingden. The quarry is composed of fine-grained grit with many cleavage lines due to the quarry working methods. It is of open aspect, and the south and west-facing walls dry out rapidly after rain. The rock is (generally) sound and the protection usually good. Belay stakes are in place on The West Face, but are limited on The South Face. However, a new fence (please do not damage this) with solid posts provides safe but distant belay points.

From Haslingden follow the Grane Road (B6263)%towards Blackburn, past the Duke of Wellington Inn for 200 metres to a lane on the right which is signposted `Thirteen Stone Hill`. Follow this lane and park on the right just after some garages. Continue along the road for 200 metres, then turn right at the first gate and follow a track (with a culvert on its right)%through three gates into the quarry. About five minutes walk. Alternatively, the crag can be approached from Junction 5 on the M65 by heading for Haslingden on the B6232. The lane to the quarry lies about five kilometres down this road on the left, opposite the reservoirs and is signed `Thirteen Stone Hill`.

The climbing is situated on several buttresses which form an arc, generally overlooking the pool. The most natural approach for most of the climbs is from the right and so they are described from RIGHT to LEFT. However, the climbs on The North Face and Little Buttress are generally approached from the left and so these climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT, starting from The North Face.

This pleasant little quarry is situated east of the A6033 some four kilometres from Littleborough. It is clearly visible from the Littleborough–Todmorden road, on the hillside almost opposite the Bird I` Th` Hand pub.

To reach the quarry, leave the A6033 at Warland Gate End, which lies almost opposite the Bird I`Th Hand pub. Follow this lane across the Rochdale canal and left up a hill. A sharp turn right at some houses leads to a steep hill. This can be followed to a parking place on the left. A gate on the other side of the lane opens onto a track which contours past sheds and leads into the quarry. A direct start is possible; cross the canal and go over a fence right of the house. A track leads up from here into the quarry. This approach often renders the hardest moves of the day as a guard dog, living at the house and sometimes unleashed, needs an impromptu body-swerve for success.

The climbs are described from RIGHT to LEFT, using the obvious arête on the Main Tier as a reference point. Right of this is a large ledge. All belays (Friends, nuts etc.) are at the foot of the upper tier.

The Main Quarry at Warton is the huge limestone quarry that dominates the view of the hillside from the M6. There is much loose rock in places and so the quarry can seem daunting on first acquaintance. However, the climbing generally manages to avoid the loosest sections and those who do take the effort to get to know the quarry will be rewarded with some of the best routes in Lancashire, especially if the sun is shining. Having said this, there are also some of the worst routes, with many being amazingly loose. These routes will be pointed out in order that they can be avoided (or appreciated by those who enjoy that sort of adventure!).

The quarry entrance is about one kilometre past the George Washington pub (alias the Black Bull Inn) at Warton, on the upper road (Crag Road) to Silverdale.

The routes are described from RIGHT to LEFT from the quarry entrance.

Although the crag is known as Pinnacle Crag, the pinnacle itself is relatively small and is slightly isolated from the best climbing, which lies on the continuous area of rock known as Plum Buttress. There are also some other isolated buttresses that provide worthwhile climbing towards the extremities of the crag.

About forty metres past the stile, turn right and continue for a little over 200 metres, ignoring a path which crosses near the start, to a small stile. The small outcrop to the left of this is Stile Buttress, which marks the far right extremity of the crag. Turn left immediately before the stile and follow the line of the outcrop for a good 200 metres to reach Plum Buttress. It is a little easier under foot to avoid the path which skirts the foot of the crag, but do not stray too far from this, or you may miss the crag altogether. The isolated buttress with a double overhang about 120 metres from Stile Buttress is Mounting Buttress and Plum Buttress is the next, more continuous section.

The crag is very popular with organized groups and so it is not unusual to find all the easier routes occupied. It also manages to be both sheltered and sunny, but when it does get wet, some parts are slow to dry.

Some of the first few routes should be avoided when cars (particularly your own!) are parked beneath!

However, whilst the crag catches the sun for much of the day, it comes into the shade later on and so it can be cold in the evening. Fortunately, it is only five minutes walk to Pinnacle Crag and the combination of starting at Warton Upper and then moving to Warton Pinnacle can make an excellent day.

To reach Pinnacle Crag from the Upper Crag, follow a good path from the left end of the top of the crag to the beacon and trig. point on top of the hill. 30 metres on is a small outcrop where the view opens out and three paths fan out. To reach Stile Buttress follow the left-hand path for about 100 metres. To reach the top of Plum Buttress, follow the central path, avoiding a very faint path which branches left and passing well to the right of a pointed boulder. The DESCENT route lies about five metres to the right of the point at which the crag top is reached.

The climbing at Fairy Steps is situated on two parallel escarpments, the Upper and Lower Crags. These are both several hundred metres long and they consist of climbable rock of up to a maximum of 10 metres high, interspersed with many broken sections. It is a pity that this area has been ignored and written off by climbers in the past, because this has only resulted in paths becoming lost, an increase of lichen growth and an overuse of the other documented crags in the area. The crags face west and as a result of recent tree thinning many of the buttresses now enjoy afternoon sunshine, which has greatly improved the climbing. This makes Fairy Steps a pleasant little crag that is well worth an evening visit.

The slopes to the foot of the crag have been extensively quarried to leave steep tiers of shattered rock separated by steep grass slopes and unstable scree. Nevertheless, access to the foot of the natural crag is possible, though it is a serious venture, which makes it probably one of the most difficult inland crags to get to in England. However, those climbers who are willing to negotiate this somewhat hazardous approach will be rewarded by some good climbing.

All the climbs can be reached by abseil from the top of the crag, which is reached by continuing up the obvious track above the black slab until it is possible to strike back right. However, any abseils from the top are long, serious and for most climbers are utterly frightening. Therefore, abseil approaches are only recommended for the routes on Stride Pinnacle.

The main crag is bounded on its left by a long broken ridge, Long Ridge, which gives many pleasant variations at around Diff. If the ridge is followed in its entirety, it gives the longest vertical route in the Lancashire Area.

Collectively the four quarries are the biggest rock playground in the area, and the number of high-quality routes is astonishing. Indeed, there are many classic climbs hereabouts, comparable to the best of the English outcrops. There is something for everyone at Wilton, with long, serious routes in Wilton One, some interesting, technical test-pieces in Two and shorter, generally easier climbing in Three. Wilton Four is the shortest of the quarries and the surroundings are somewhat dismal, but even here, there is good climbing to be had.

The complex of four quarries which makes up the Wilton area lies only six kilometres North of Bolton on the A675 Bolton’Preston road. From Bolton, follow this road until the Wilton Arms pub is reached on the left, directly below the spoil heaps from Wilton One. Continue for nearly one kilometre to a sharp left turn (Scout Road) and follow this steeply to a small parking area on the right 300 metres up. Shortly before this parking space there is a green gate on the right-hand side, from where a track leads directly into Wilton Three. Wilton Two and Four are situated a little nearer to the sharp bend in the road and are also on the right. Wilton One lies about 40 metres from the sharp bend on the left-hand side of the road. It is best reached by following a faint path that leads slightly leftwards about 25 metres before the sharp bend.

The routes in all four quarries are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Wilton One is the largest of the four quarries.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

There is no climbing allowed in Wilton Two on Wednesdays, Fridays or Sundays

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

There is no climbing allowed in Wilton Three on Wednesdays, Fridays or Sundays. Wilton Three is the first quarry on the right when approaching from the A675 up Scout Road. The quarry is one of the most popular in the whole Lancashire area, and is very well used on warm summer evenings by locals to work up a sweat and a thirst before a session in either the Wilton Arms or the Bob`s Smithy.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Over the years this quarry has become needlessly neglected by the majority of climbers. This is a pity, because it contains some excellent climbing. It is the smallest of the four quarries on this site and lies at the top of Scout Road, just before the sharp bend at the top.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

Belays at the top are on special belay stakes and it is important that climbers should avoid trampling the meadow at the top, by keeping close to the edge of the quarry and descending via one of the stiles at either end.

The quarry has been re-opened as a working quarry, with the loss of some poor routes. However, there is still some climbing on the walls at either edge of the quarry and these are generally sound and of good quality. Furthermore, the climbs that remain, lie well away from the active workings.

Many of the routes at the right-hand end of the crag are unpleasantly polished, and if conditions are at all damp, the whole crag can be abominable. The relatively neglected areas north of the Well certainly deserve more attention.

From Warton follow the road towards Silverdale and turn left after the level-crossing, then first left again (signposted to Jenny Brown`s Point) and continue for just over one kilometre to a junction at Wolf House Gallery, where the main road bears right into the village (the road to the left leads to Jack Scout and is signposted to Jenny Brown`s Point). Turn right a couple of hundred metres past the first houses in the village at the first road (Woodwell Lane), which leads to a car park. The Well itself and Well Buttress lie directly behind the fenced pool.

This small gritstone quarry is situated about one kilometre south-east of the southern end of Pule Hill Outcrop. Although it is short, it is easily accessible and the rock is very solid, making it an ideal place for an evening visit.

From Oldham or Delph, follow the A62 towards Huddersfield as far as the Standedge Cutting. Immediately after this the Great Western Hotel will be passed on the left and Pule Hill will be seen directly in front. Take the next turn right (Mount Road) and follow it for just over one kilometre until the quarry can be seen on the left. There is good parking and a short track leads up to the quarry.

The climbs are described from LEFT to RIGHT.

 

 

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